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Vol. LXII, No. 2
January 22, 2010
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Milestones

Dr. Rajiv Kumar

Kumar Named New IRG Chief

The Center for Scientific Review recently named Dr. Rajiv Kumar as new chief of the musculo-skeletal, oral and skin sciences integrated review group (MOSS), after he successfully served as its acting chief since January 2009.

“Dr. Kumar demonstrated impressive leadership through challenging times for MOSS,” said CSR director Dr. Toni Scarpa, referring to Kumar’s contributions during review of grants under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

In addition to his new role, Kumar will continue serving as scientific review officer for CSR’s electrical signaling, ion transport and arrhythmias study section.

Kumar has a Ph.D. in chemistry from India’s Kanpur University and Central Drug Research Institute, where he studied the neural regulation of heart function. Before joining NIH in 2003, he conducted postdoctoral research in the department of pediatrics at Emory University, where he later served as assistant professor of pediatrics and research director of the Todd Franklin Cardiac Research Laboratory. He has conducted extensive research on the regulation of ion channels in heart cells.

Dr. Patrick Duffy

Duffy To Lead New NIAID Laboratory

Dr. Patrick Duffy has been appointed chief of the newly established Laboratory of Malaria Immunology and Vaccinology (LMIV) in NIAID’s Division of Intramural Research. He is former director of the malaria program at Seattle Biomedical Research Institute (SBRI) and affiliate professor of pathobiology at the University of Washington. His research accomplishments include describing how malaria develops during pregnancy, defining the benefits of antibodies that protect pregnant women and their fetuses from malaria and pioneering the use of functional genomics tools to study malaria parasites in the field.

As chief of LMIV, Duffy leads a team studying the immunology of populations at risk of malaria infection to develop more effective strategies for vaccination. He also oversees LMIV’s pilot vaccine production and testing initiatives, which enable multiple vaccine candidates to move from concept to clinical trials.

Prior to working at SBRI, Duffy was director of preclinical vaccine development in the malaria program at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and he served as chief of field research operations at the WRAIR station in Kisumu, Kenya, for 4 years. He received his postdoctoral training in malaria research at NIAID after earning his medical degree from Duke University School of Medicine.

NIEHS’s Birnbaum Elected to Collegium Ramazzini

Dr. Linda Birnbaum

NIEHS and National Toxicology Program director Dr. Linda Birnbaum received notification in December of her election as a fellow of the Collegium Ramazzini headquartered in Carpi, Italy. The letter from Collegium Ramazzini secretary general Dr. Morando Soffritti praised Birnbaum for her “scientific stature and authority” and “commitment to the public’s health.”

Birnbaum described her election as “a great honor” and said she looks forward to working with this prestigious group.

With 180 fellows in 30 countries, the Collegium Ramazzini is an international scientific society that examines critical issues in occupational and environmental health with a view towards action to prevent disease and promote health. The fellows are professionals of personal distinction and integrity, distinguished by their contributions to occupational and environmental health.

Birnbaum is one of a group of current and former NIEHS scientists who are Collegium Ramazzini fellows. Among the several fellows who are NIEHS grantees is Dr. Philip Landrigan, who serves as Collegium Ramazzini president.



NIMH’s Schulze Receives German Neuroscience Prize
Dr. Thomas G. Schulze (c), assistant director of clinical research in NIMH’s unit on the genetic basis of mood and anxiety disorders, was recently awarded the Hans-Jörg-Weitbrecht Award for Clinical Neuroscience during the annual meeting of the German Association for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy (DGPPN). The honor was presented by Prof. Wolfgang Maier (l) of the University of Bonn and member of the DGPPN board of directors and Dr. Jörg Czekalla (r) of Bayer Schering Pharma.

Dr. Thomas G. Schulze (c), assistant director of clinical research in NIMH’s unit on the genetic basis of mood and anxiety disorders, was recently awarded the Hans-Jörg-Weitbrecht Award for Clinical Neuroscience during the annual meeting of the German Association for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy (DGPPN). The honor was presented by Prof. Wolfgang Maier (l) of the University of Bonn and member of the DGPPN board of directors and Dr. Jörg Czekalla (r) of Bayer Schering Pharma. Since its establishment in 1985, the honor has been considered one of the most prestigious German awards for neuroscience. Schulze was cited for his “outstanding contributions in the field of the identification of the genetic basis of psychiatric disorders, using innovative genetic-statistical tools and detailed characterization of the psychopathological picture.”

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