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Vol. LXIV, No. 8
April 13, 2012
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Grady Promotes Clinical and Translational Science at UC Irvine

NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady highlighted the importance of interprofessional and multidisciplinary teams in science and evidence-based health care at a recent clinical and translational science (CTS) event presented by the University of California Irvine Program in Nursing Science. She served as the kickoff speaker for the new seminar series, which is cosponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the UC Irvine Institute for Clinical and Translational Science.

NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady (c) poses with (from l) Dr. Ellen Olshansky, professor and director of the University of California Irvine Program in Nursing Science, and Dr. Alison Holman, assistant professor, UC Irvine Program in Nursing Science and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation nurse faculty scholar. Grady holds the UC Irvine mascot.

NINR director Dr. Patricia Grady (c) poses with (from l) Dr. Ellen Olshansky, professor and director of the University of California Irvine Program in Nursing Science, and Dr. Alison Holman, assistant professor, UC Irvine Program in Nursing Science and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation nurse faculty scholar. Grady holds the UC Irvine mascot.

Photo: Elizabeth Eastin

Drawing from the 2010 Institute of Medicine report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, Grady noted, “Nursing science, because of its exceptionally broad mandate and the cross-cutting nature of its research portfolio, is active in virtually every field of clinical translational science.”

Grady described several NINR CTS research efforts that are taking bench and bedside discoveries and translating them into sustainable and scalable solutions to advance health care in real-world settings. Examples include microchip technology for HIV detection in Africa; radio frequency identification technologies in surgical suites; theory-driven health promotion and disease prevention interventions for underserved inner-city communities; and national initiatives in transitional care supported by the Affordable Care Act, the National Quality Forum, the Veterans Administration, CMS, AARP and Kaiser Permanente.

Grady also discussed two major CTS initiatives that are transforming the health sciences and health care: the Campaign for Action, a nationwide initiative sponsored by RWJF, AARP and the AARP Foundation that is implementing IOM’s Future of Nursing recommendations, and the CTSA Consortium, now part of the new National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

In conclusion, Grady said, “Nursing research—and its translation into evidence-based practice and policy—stands as a keystone for improving the health and welfare of people around the world, and at NINR we see CTS and implementation research as essential components of our core mission.” NIHRecord Icon


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